Wired for Sound - Southern Africa Mobile Recording Studio

Media

Wired for Sound on Okayafrica

OKAY okay

Freshlyground‘s Simon Attwell and Julio Sigauque and radio producer Kim Winter recently turned us onto new music coming out of Northern Mozambique through their “mobile recording studio” project Wired For Sound (WFS). Funded by the Open Society Initiative of Southern Africa (OSISA), the trio equipped a 4×4 with solar panels and a battery system to capture sounds from more remote areas of the region. With the world as a recording studio, the WFS team partnered with local community radio stations to host live discussions and interviews with up-and-coming musicians to be broadcast on community airwaves. They then took the recordings back to South Africa for further mixing, mastering and collaborations (including with Freshlyground’s Zolani Mahola) with the goal of producing a full-length album (the proceeds of which would go towards creating permanent recording/producing facilities in the featured artists’ communities). In the day leading up to Mozambique’s 39th Independence Day, Wired For Read More

Wired for Sound on Africa is a Country

aiac_2

Listen to a selection of tracks the Africa is a Country team enjoyed from the Wired for Sound Mozambique album here Africa is a Country.

Wired for Sound on Chicafrican

chicafrican

FRESHLY GROUND IS WIRED FOR SOUND As in most of Africa, music is the lifeblood of Malawi and Freshlyground’s innovative Wired for Sound project aims to take it to the world. When the sun sinks into Lake Malawi, it splatters a light so radiant the water seems to be ablaze. Like the flames of a fire. In the Chichewa language, this is called Malawi and it’s how the smallest, but most densely populated country in southern Africa, got its name. In July of this year that magnificent setting could be the backdrop to a truly original hit single. Wired for Sound is a mobile, solar-powered recording studio, created by Freshlyground’s Simon Attwell and Julio Sigauque, and radio producer Kim Winter. Mid-year they plan to take it to Malawi for the second edition of their highly successful talent search. Their simple Read More

Wired for Sound on Voyage D’etudes

Voayge Final

Wired for Sound is a mobile recording studio powered by the sun. After a year of research, testing and plotting we created a set up that means we can record wherever we find ourselves and in August September 2013 we found ourselves on the first of many journeys. Traveling over 12 000km for two and a half months, our team of three (Simon Attwell, Julio Sigauque of Freshlyground and radio producer, Kim Winter) crossed Northern Mozambique from the western border town of Catandica making our way east, moving as far up as Niassa Nature Reserve (one of the world’s last truly wild places) on the Tazanian border, to the coastal town of Pemba and Ilha de Mozambique. In partnership with community radio, meeting, jamming and recording with local artists, we want to create a more insightful and dynamic way of exploring Read More

Blues Rag Review!

Catandica, Mozambique (13 of 47)

IF YOU hadn’t yet heard, you certainly will now: Backcountry Mozambique is a virtual goldmine of groove, where music with a naturally inherent fizz has been waiting, patiently, to be dug by worldwide audiences. And Wired for Sound—in the grand tradition of the great Hugh Tracey’s sonic safaris throughout these parts in the 1940s and ‘50s—is newly prospecting its way across the land with an inquisitive microphone. As we speak, Simon Attwell (South African fusionists, Freshlyground), Kim Winter (radio producer) and Julio Sigauque (Freshlyground) continue roving about the continent in search of startup singers and musicians who, in turn, are in search of broader outlets, brighter horizons. Mozambique is Wired’s pilot project, the spectacular first in a highly anticipated series of kaleidoscopic views of southern Africa.   Running off of a solar panel, their portable studio ventures into the real Read More

Review: Afropop

afropop 2

We don’t hear a lot of music from Mozambique. There have been some fine releases of classic marrabentadance music, and a few roots-pop bands like Ghorwane, Eyuphuro and Mabulu all produced memorable CDs in their times. There’s a Rough Guide survey of the country’s, mostly older, music. Then there are a number of releases of mind-bending Chopi timbila (wooden xylophone) orchestras, by the likes of Venancio Mbande. Probably the best introduction to Mozambican traditional music is still GlobeStyle’s two-volume series, recorded in 1989, when that country’s debilitating civil war was still simmering. But none of these releases really take stock of the musical country that has been emerging in the wake of that long war. That’s what makes Wired For Sound: Mozambique a prized new entry in the small catalogue of Mozambique recordings. A team of three young musician/producers associated with the South African pop band Freshlyground Read More

Review: KCRW

Rythm-Planet-Club-300x250

There’s an intriguing new album out via an organization called Wired for Sound, put together by Simon Attwell, founding member of the South African supergroup Freshlyground. The organization is known by its acronym OSISA (Open Society Initiative for Southern Africa). They have put together a modern roaming field-recording studio, taken it into remote regions of Southern Africa, in this case Mozambique. The mobile studio is compact at 4×4 feet, runs on solar power panels, and solar powered batteries. So, whilst recording in the remote areas, they didn’t have to rely on power outlets or fear running out of batteries. This mobile, solar powered set up allows Wired For Sound to easily record musicians who otherwise would never be heard outside their villages. This album also offers a glimpse into contemporary musical trends inside these remote areas, with 17 different artists/groups featured. They spent 5 weeks Read More

Review: FAME

WFS_Cover_R

I don’t quite know what the guitars those three street-level gents are playing on the cover shot to Moçambique are, but they’re tripped out and indicative of what the listener is in for: an anthology disc capturing an array of ground-level Mozambique sounds taking the region’s traditional folk musics into today and tomorrow, not to mention preparing it all for export to a world more than ready for such work. The disc opens with Million Isaac Junior’s fetchingly mellifluous Thikulola blending Joseph Shabalala type vocals and rhythms with a ghostly slide guitar taking the happy atmosphere around the corner to meet with its forebears from the Great Beyond. Then, two songs later, the mononymic Alfredo starts Musia do Cantino with a brief but complex speedy guitar riff (courtesy Derek Gripper) before falling into a serial minimal groove, Alredo singing and playing pankwe (an unusual double-gourd zithery/dulcimerish Read More

Wired for Sound on Bush Radio

Unhappy Hour

Tonight we chat to Julio Sigauque, Kim Winter and Simon Atwell from Wired for Sound about their Mozambique project. They spent almost 3 months in Mozambique visiting community radio stations and recording local artists using their mobile studio. The resulting album is now available on iTunes and all profits will go to the participating community stations and to invest in recording gear so that musicians from these often very remote areas can record their songs and get them out to their audience. Almost the whole of tonight’s show is dedicated to this project. Host: Toast Coetzer. The Unhappy Hour show broadcasts live from Cape Town, South Africa, every Sunday 6-8 pm on Bush Radio 89.5 FM Click here to listen

Wired for Sound on BBC

Focus_on_africa_screenshot

A musical project has produced a fund raising album which explores the music of Northern Mozambique- “Wired for Sound” is the name of the venture of South African ‘Freshly Ground’ band member Simon Attwell and radio producer Kim Winter. These friends went with a solar powered mobile recording studio travelling through Mozambique’s 5 northern province. BBC Focus on Africa’s Alice Muthengi spoke to Simon and Kim about the project… Click here to listen